Tag Archives: death

On Anger and Bravery: love need be the only voice

braveryIf someone would have told me years ago that I’d be a healer and Love helping people, that I’d see it as a Privilege, I’d have told them that they were totally and truly bat-shit crazy. Actually, I wouldn’t have told them; more likely, I’d have done something vilely, insidiously passive-aggressive towards them. It was my own preferred expression of anger that ‘didn’t look like’ anger.

Most everyone that knows me presently will find this extremely difficult to believe, but (if it isn’t obvious from that last paragraph) I used to hate people. And I didn’t discriminate, either; I hated pretty much everyone.

Did I have a ‘why’? Not that I would – or even, could – have thought about it this way at the time, but it was because everyone else needed to recognize how hurt I was, and everyone else was responsible for how I felt. They must have been. After all, I wasn’t. Right? It’s so much easier to hate other people than to admit that you hate yourself.

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Letting Go: death as liberator

light and tunnelContrary to how things might appear or feel to you right now, with what you’re going through, things are actually about to take off in your world. Your unique life experiences have prepared you in a way that will make the most of what it is you’re letting go of at this time, and there are soul-level rewards to be embraced as a result.

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there’s a problem (or is there?): I don’t believe in death

death endSearch online for “death, meaning” and you’ll be presented with answers like ‘end of life’ and /or ‘cessation of vital functions’. Personally, I find that really funny, in that supposed descriptions of what death is are actually definitions that are not only dependent upon but in a practical sense actually only describe what it’s not.

And if an appreciation of death (as a ‘thing’ or event) is dependent upon an understanding of what it means to be ‘alive’, we find ourselves on a whole contraindicative slope of ascertaining what ‘life’ is. We can generally talk about definitions of life as predicated on the idea of matter animated by a life ‘force’, but for the fact that even what we define as dead plant matter nourishes life (as compost, for example), must it not by extension (still) have some ‘life’ in it?

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Death Changes Your Mind

death5Our physical self is great matter for our spirit. It connects you to your experience in ways that your presupposed thoughts alone can’t. For the majority of us (not having a conscious appreciation of having experienced it before), death causes us to surrender to sensation, apart even from how our thoughts rationalize or interpret those sensations.

‘The’ truly personal journey, the expiration of our physical bodies, death inspires us to an appreciation of aspects of life we’re otherwise inclined to deny. Whether your own appears imminent, or is a long way off, ultimately, there’s no ‘thinking’ our way through it. It’s the one education that our minds can’t ‘solve’ for us, and as such, it grounds us in visceral experience.

It sets the appeal that you trust your intuition and throw the net of your awareness out into the world around you, pulling in truths that may defy your intellect, your rational mind, and what your conditioning might wish to (superficially) espouse.

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A Sirius Wolf Story (a death-origin myth)

sirius mary and jesus

A light came to earth and brought teachers to Human. They taught Human all the time, even in Human’s sleep, and thinking to nourish themselves, they ate truths while they were teaching.

Over time and because of what they were themselves learning from being around Human, the teachers split up into Wolf, Coyote and Dog, so that they could make more opportunities to eat.

Wolf HuntWolf fed itself by convincing Human that the best way to survive was to be the fiercest and strongest. With no one else to fight, Human fought Shadow. Wolf would watch Human rage and it would fill him up.

Coyote would range far and wide. Wherever Human went, Coyote played tricks to make Human think and do crazy things. Coyote would laugh and laugh, and it filled him up.

Dog stayed close to Human, and instead of eating truths or making Human crazy, was fed by Human’s friendship, of which he was very protective.

One day Coyote thought to himself, “Why should Wolf have so much influence? And why should Dog’s life be so simple? I’m the clever one! I will break this bond between Wolf and Dog and Human!”

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